Dissection of an email - Feigning injuries

The full text of the email is available on DNA
The following day Sourav batted in the match against Zimbabwe ‘A’ team in the game in Mutare. I am not sure of the exact timing of events because I was in the nets with other players when Sourav went in to bat, but the new ball had either just been taken or was imminent when I saw Sourav walking from the field holding his right arm. I assumed he had been hit and made my way to the players’ area where Sourav was receiving treatment from the team physiotherapist, John Gloster.
When I enquired as to what had happened Sourav said he had felt a click in his elbow as he played a ball through the leg side and that he thought he should have it investigated. Sourav had complained of pain to his elbow at various stages of the one-day series, but he had resisted having any comprehensive investigation done and, from my observation, had been spasmodic in his treatment habits, often not using ice-packs for the arm that had been prepared for him by John Gloster. I suggested, as had John Gloster, that we get some further tests done immediately. Sourav rejected these suggestions and said he would be ‘fine’. When I queried what he meant by ‘fine’ he said he would be fit for the Test match. I then queried why then was it necessary to be off the field now. He said that he was just taking ‘precautions’.
Rather than make a scene with other players and officials in the vicinity I decided to leave the matter and observe what Sourav would do from that point on. After the loss of Kaif, Yuvraj and Karthik to the new ball, Sourav returned to the crease with the ball now around 20 overs old. He struggled for runs against a modest attack and eventually threw his wicket away trying to hit one of the spinners over the leg side.
The next day I enquired with a number of the players as to what they had thought of Sourav’s retirement. The universal response was that it was ‘just Sourav’ as they recounted a list of times when Sourav had suffered from mystery injuries that usually disappeared as quickly as they had come. This disturbed me because it confirmed for me that he was in a fragile state of mind and it was affecting the mental state of other members of the squad.

Most of this has been been reported earlier. The thing is everybody knows about the way Saurav feigns these li'l injuries (remember Nagpur last year), but this is the first time someone is really going after him and questioning him about it. Saurav has lost so much credibilty that even if he does get genuinely injured, he would need a doctor certificate for others to believe him. I wouldn't blame Chappell if he thinks Saurav did that to avoid facing the new ball.

Doesn't this remind you of the kid in school who used to skip gym classes saying that he is not feeling well? Ganguly can be a kid at times, but sadly for him international Cricket is no gym class that he can skip by using false pretences. Atleast not for long - especially, when your gym teacher is someone as strict as Chappell.

When we arrived in Bulawayo I decided I needed to ask Sourav if he had over-played the injury to avoid the danger period of the new ball as it had appeared to me and others within the touring party that he had protected himself at the expense of others. He denied the suggestion and asked why he would do that against such a modest attack. I said that he was the only one who could answer that question.

I would have loved to see the expression on Saurav's face when Chappell asked him about over-playing the injury. He wouldn't really have expected Chappell to ask him on the face. Had only anyone captured it on Camera, it would have made the cover page of the Saurav's "Shocking moments of my life" book.

Labels: , , ,

« Home | Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »

» Post a Comment